Random Brewing Thoughts

Discussion in 'Brewing & Beer Knowledge' started by Snarf, Sep 14, 2014.

  1. Phischy

    Phischy

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    I put mine in milk cartons to move them around. Same with carboys.
     
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  2. hornydevil

    hornydevil

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    Indeed.

    Get sick of posting brewing rig pics on AW yet? ;)
     
  3. Phischy

    Phischy

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    You know it's down for repairs and upgrades!
     
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  4. TripleSixHoppia

    TripleSixHoppia

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    Keg, picnic tap, and a short length of plastic tubing. That's how I do mine. I just add the bottling sugar and beer to a purged keg. Give it a good mix and use 3 PSI or whatever it takes to push it out. Works great.
     
  5. JCastle

    JCastle

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    Tell me more about this! I have to bottle 20 gallons soon and not looking forward to it. Can't believe this hadn't occurred to me before.
     
  6. Snarf

    Snarf

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    Sure does, that's why I havent used a bucket in forever, but need new cobra tap etc.

    procrastimated until
     
  7. TripleSixHoppia

    TripleSixHoppia

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    http://www.homebrewtalk.com/showthread.php?t=24678

    Basically those instruction. But instead of a carbonated keg, just rack your un-carbed beer, bottling sugar, and any bottling yeast to a keg. Then fill bottles.
     
  8. jivex5k

    jivex5k

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    I'm about ready for a keg setup, finally motivated myself to bottle today. I've been sticking to 22oz or bigger to make it more tolerable lately.

    [​IMG]
     
  9. Phischy

    Phischy

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    Your paper towel situation is much more dire.
     
  10. Snarf

    Snarf

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    Anyone let a mixed ferment beer sit so long it 'died' for lack of a better term?

    I expected fairly quick takeoff on the saison I put on grapes, but nothing. I've had some slow starts with old beer, but it has been a couple weeks now.

    I guess it might be fermenting so slowly as to not be visibly evident, particularly as the beer is dead flat, but if that were the case I'd think the fruit would form a cap or at least make the carboy look like a bottle of Orbitz, but it is all on the bottom still.
     
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  11. FTowne

    FTowne

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    How long did it ferment for before you put it on the fruit?
     
  12. Snarf

    Snarf

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    Year and a half maybe? Hadn't looked in a couple days and it actually has a few little bubbles around the top today.:oops:
     
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  13. TripleSixHoppia

    TripleSixHoppia

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    Low pH and a year old, that yeast and bacteria is going to be on the struggle bus. Brett is always slow AF to kick back up anyway. I'd say watch it. If nothing sees to happens, make a small starter of with dregs or what ever yeast you used.
     
  14. Snarf

    Snarf

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    I don't think time and pH is the sole factor here. I've done plenty of refermentations of old, acidic beer before without such lengthy lag time, which is why I thought this was odd enough to mention. There is no way I would add any sort of additional microbes to the beer at this point, even if it failed to referment. I doubt they'd do much of anything if it is in fact a low pH situation that is the cause of the delay. I've had more acidic beer lag less, though.
     
  15. TripleSixHoppia

    TripleSixHoppia

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    You can add a portion of your beer to your base starter medium to acclimate the new yeast and bacteria to the low pH environment.

    http://www.milkthefunk.com/wiki/Saccharomyces#Fermentation_Under_Low_pH_Conditions
    http://www.milkthefunk.com/wiki/Packaging#Acid_Shock_Starters
     
  16. Snarf

    Snarf

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    Considering that's the 'Upland technique' I think the better plan is to make less acidic beer if you need to acclimatize your bottling strain to it.

    If your beer will kill wine yeast, it probably doesn't taste good.
     
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  17. FTowne

    FTowne

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    Next time you do a mixed ferment beer just bottle it up after a month or so and call it a "New World Sour".
     
  18. hornydevil

    hornydevil

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    Do you know about terminal acid shock? If you don't, you should read up on it.

    Really? That's uninformed in so many ways.
     
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  19. reverseapachemaster

    reverseapachemaster

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    I wouldn't be concerned with ph because the microbes in the beer have acclimated to that environment for the past year and a half--unless the ph has dropped ridiculously low. The issue is likely just lazy yeast plus the fruit. If the fruit went in whole it may take a little time to swell, burst and make for an easy food source for brett and friends.
     
  20. hornydevil

    hornydevil

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    Depends which microbes are more active at the time of bottling. After a certain period of time, your sacch. might not be very viable and your brett may take a longer time to carbonate. If you're looking for consistency, reyeasting with fresh sacch. is the way to go. If you don't mind waiting, using the microbes that you fermented with will usually do just fine.

    If yeast are "lazy" there is a reason and the old yarn about doing things to break cell walls in fruit is a bit more than a little exaggerated.
     
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