Andy Rooney

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Nov 25, 2015
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Over the decades we’ve visited countless taprooms and tasted a lifetime of beers. Many of them have been served in sampler format—you know, a paddle of 4-ounce tasting glasses often arranged from light to dark. Depending on the beer, they typically run from $1 to $4 per pour. We’ve also seen everything from one beer to dozens of styles offered in a single sampler. Fun! Right?

Unfortunately, they usually suck. Allow us to explain.

Too many taprooms put too much focus into the paddle, which is often more impressive than the beers themselves. And while the rainbow of colors presented adds to the eye candy factor, samplers are almost always poured to the top of the glass, a practice that yields lifeless beers. Not to mention you can’t properly smell a beer without some head, which aids in releasing aromatics and directly impacts taste.

On top of this, in an attempt to fill them completely, servers often struggle to pour puny sampler glasses and end up wasting a lot of beer due to foam issues. This also makes them highly prone to spillage on the way to the consumer.

Our solution: quality over quantity. Drop beer samples into an appropriate glass that allows for some head retention and the ability to properly smell and taste the beer. Like it or not, first impressions are important. Show beer samples some respect, and your reward will be more happy customers.

Respect Beer.
 
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Joined
Nov 25, 2015
Messages
22
Location
Beyond...


Imagine a world without whalez. No, not the marine mammal, but those elusive beers that require people to stand in line or trade their firstborn in order to obtain a taste and some humblebrags on social media. You know who you are.

We witnessed such a world at our Microbrew Invitational event last month, wherein we carefully curated a diverse lineup of small brewers and challenged them each to bring a brew to debut at the fest. And it was glorious. Aside from the surprise line or two, there was no waiting. None. Attendees were able to explore the lineup, talk to brewers and try new things. There wasn’t a bad beer in the house either. Better yet, we didn’t end up with a crowd full of whale hunters.

Sure, the fest was smallish (over 70 brewers), but it was a snapshot of the diversity and creativity found throughout today’s beer industry. And with nearly two breweries opening every day in the US and thousands more in planning, there’s much more of it to come.

Our point? Far too many of you are obsessed with a handful of brewers who create hype. Don’t get sucked in, try this instead: Stop hunting for whalez. Skip the next rare bottle release. Walk past the next line at a fest. Use your saved time to try something new or unfamiliar and then talk about it, because you’re definitely missing out otherwise.

Respect Beer.
 
Joined
Apr 26, 2014
Messages
1,055
Location
Lake Champlain


Over the decades we’ve visited countless taprooms and tasted a lifetime of beers. Many of them have been served in sampler format—you know, a paddle of 4-ounce tasting glasses often arranged from light to dark. Depending on the beer, they typically run from $1 to $4 per pour. We’ve also seen everything from one beer to dozens of styles offered in a single sampler. Fun! Right?

Unfortunately, they usually suck. Allow us to explain.

Too many taprooms put too much focus into the paddle, which is often more impressive than the beers themselves. And while the rainbow of colors presented adds to the eye candy factor, samplers are almost always poured to the top of the glass, a practice that yields lifeless beers. Not to mention you can’t properly smell a beer without some head, which aids in releasing aromatics and directly impacts taste.

On top of this, in an attempt to fill them completely, servers often struggle to pour puny sampler glasses and end up wasting a lot of beer due to foam issues. This also makes them highly prone to spillage on the way to the consumer.

Our solution: quality over quantity. Drop beer samples into an appropriate glass that allows for some head retention and the ability to properly smell and taste the beer. Like it or not, first impressions are important. Show beer samples some respect, and your reward will be more happy customers.

Respect Beer.
I like this thread and see your point. In fact, one of our newest brewers here in Vermont and is starting to brew some exceptional brews that not many know about outside of this state. They do not do flights. My hat goes off to them (Foam Brewers) in downtown Burlington for every beer I have tried so far has been exceptional.
 
Joined
Oct 12, 2013
Messages
2,332
Location
Spokane, WA
I like this thread and see your point. In fact, one of our newest brewers here in Vermont and is starting to brew some exceptional brews that not many know about outside of this state. They do not do flights. My hat goes off to them (Foam Brewers) in downtown Burlington for every beer I have tried so far has been exceptional.
God damnit.
 
Joined
Nov 25, 2015
Messages
22
Location
Beyond...


Drainpour, or DP, is all the rage with the kids these days. At the first sign of dislike they’ll dump a beer, post something snarky online and move on to tick another beer. It’s almost become a badge of honor for the snobbiest of beer snobs.

Now there are a couple of schools of thought when it comes to drainpouring. The first is that dumping a beer doesn’t respect beer or its brewers. Instead, you should suffer through a beer that you don’t like or cook with it to avoid being wasteful. Unless of course it’s “infected” (another word the kids love to throw around these days). The second school of thought believes that you shouldn’t waste your time on bad beer, period. Drainpour and move on.

As for us, it’s simple. If you don’t like a beer, don’t drink it. Life is too short and good beer is too plentiful. But do you really need to brag about your drainpour like a cretin? If you simply don’t like a beer, write a constructive review to help brewers and other consumers understand why. And if you sincerely believe that a beer has quality issues, contact the brewery instead of crying about it on social media; the default for too many people today.

By taking helpful action, you can still be a beer advocate.

Respect Beer.
 
Joined
Nov 25, 2015
Messages
22
Location
Beyond...


Turbid Times. No, we’re not hinting at some sort of confusion in the beer industry. We’re talking about an unfortunate side effect caused by a lack of quality as more people blindly jump on the beer train: turbidity.

Presentation is part of the experience of enjoying beer and an influencer for consumers. It’s the eye candy that teases the other senses and sets expectations. It’s the all-important first impression. So why are a growing number of brewers releasing beers that frankly look like shit?

For example, when we order a Pilsner or Pale Ale, we shouldn’t be handed what appears to be a Hefeweizen gone bad. Unfortunately, we’re seeing a lot of this lately. Beers that should be bright instead look like murky pond water or milky abominations waiting to wreak havoc on your gut.

Ever hear the term “drop bright”? Show that beer some love! Give it more time. Move it into a bright tank to condition. Let the yeast and sediment drop. Filter it. Lager it. Use a high flocculating yeast. Do something!

And just to be (ahem) clear, we’re not talking about unfiltered or bottle-conditioned beers, which can pour bright if decanted properly. We’re not talking about certain styles, like Hefeweizen, which should be unfiltered and moderately clouded with yeast and sediment, either. We mean a beer with so much yeast and sediment in suspension that you can’t see the sun through it.

Let’s put an end to these turbid times. Not only does it look bad for individual beers, and beer in general, it also negatively impacts aroma and flavor. And who wants that?

Respect Beer.
 
Joined
Nov 25, 2015
Messages
22
Location
Beyond...


"Despite all the Q4 2012 hate toward the American shaker pint, it’ll survive another year as the preferred serving vessel for beer as they continue to be inexpensive, stackable and versatile.”

More than three years later, the standard 16-ounce American pint glass or shaker pint still reigns supreme, but unfortunately the hate has endured, too. By now we’ve heard it all. Shaker pints destroy good beer. They’re dirty. They’re ugly. The heat from your hand warms the beer too quickly. They don’t hold a full 16 ounces with a proper head and you can’t get good head retention with their shape anyway. Blah, blah, blah.

Don’t get us wrong. We’ve been advocates of beer glassware since we launched our site in the late ’90s, and using the correct or traditional glass for each style (or even brand) can change your drinking experience. A single type of glassware isn’t to blame for destroying beer though. There are too many other factors at play: a bartender who sucks, a glass that wasn’t cleaned properly, a customer who’s milking their beer, or a bar that’s using cheater pints, for example.

In fact, speaking of destroying beer, there’s been a movement toward smaller, more expensive pours for years, thanks in part to anti-shaker snobs. And now we’re seeing dainty 8- or 10-ounce pours of a normal beer going for $1 or more an ounce! Thanks, but we’d rather have two servings at a reasonable price. You can keep your tulip glass.

We’d love to see more bars move to the British nonic pint, a 20-ounce container that leaves plenty of room for some proper head. It also features a bulge near the top for gripping and to stop glasses from sticking together when stacked. Not only do they look cool, they’re inexpensive, versatile and nobody hates them yet.

Respect Beer.
 
Joined
Jan 24, 2015
Messages
4,118
Location
Chicago, IL


"Despite all the Q4 2012 hate toward the American shaker pint, it’ll survive another year as the preferred serving vessel for beer as they continue to be inexpensive, stackable and versatile.”

More than three years later, the standard 16-ounce American pint glass or shaker pint still reigns supreme, but unfortunately the hate has endured, too. By now we’ve heard it all. Shaker pints destroy good beer. They’re dirty. They’re ugly. The heat from your hand warms the beer too quickly. They don’t hold a full 16 ounces with a proper head and you can’t get good head retention with their shape anyway. Blah, blah, blah.

Don’t get us wrong. We’ve been advocates of beer glassware since we launched our site in the late ’90s, and using the correct or traditional glass for each style (or even brand) can change your drinking experience. A single type of glassware isn’t to blame for destroying beer though. There are too many other factors at play: a bartender who sucks, a glass that wasn’t cleaned properly, a customer who’s milking their beer, or a bar that’s using cheater pints, for example.

In fact, speaking of destroying beer, there’s been a movement toward smaller, more expensive pours for years, thanks in part to anti-shaker snobs. And now we’re seeing dainty 8- or 10-ounce pours of a normal beer going for $1 or more an ounce! Thanks, but we’d rather have two servings at a reasonable price. You can keep your tulip glass.

We’d love to see more bars move to the British nonic pint, a 20-ounce container that leaves plenty of room for some proper head. It also features a bulge near the top for gripping and to stop glasses from sticking together when stacked. Not only do they look cool, they’re inexpensive, versatile and nobody hates them yet.

Respect Beer.
I actually totally agree with this.

Can't decide if I should go shower now, or just sit in a corner and silently hate myself.
 
Joined
May 3, 2013
Messages
17,121
Location
MPLS


"Despite all the Q4 2012 hate toward the American shaker pint, it’ll survive another year as the preferred serving vessel for beer as they continue to be inexpensive, stackable and versatile.”

More than three years later, the standard 16-ounce American pint glass or shaker pint still reigns supreme, but unfortunately the hate has endured, too. By now we’ve heard it all. Shaker pints destroy good beer. They’re dirty. They’re ugly. The heat from your hand warms the beer too quickly. They don’t hold a full 16 ounces with a proper head and you can’t get good head retention with their shape anyway. Blah, blah, blah.

Don’t get us wrong. We’ve been advocates of beer glassware since we launched our site in the late ’90s, and using the correct or traditional glass for each style (or even brand) can change your drinking experience. A single type of glassware isn’t to blame for destroying beer though. There are too many other factors at play: a bartender who sucks, a glass that wasn’t cleaned properly, a customer who’s milking their beer, or a bar that’s using cheater pints, for example.

In fact, speaking of destroying beer, there’s been a movement toward smaller, more expensive pours for years, thanks in part to anti-shaker snobs. And now we’re seeing dainty 8- or 10-ounce pours of a normal beer going for $1 or more an ounce! Thanks, but we’d rather have two servings at a reasonable price. You can keep your tulip glass.

We’d love to see more bars move to the British nonic pint, a 20-ounce container that leaves plenty of room for some proper head. It also features a bulge near the top for gripping and to stop glasses from sticking together when stacked. Not only do they look cool, they’re inexpensive, versatile and nobody hates them yet.

Respect Beer.
Q4 2012 hate....man they have this bullshit down to the quarter
 
Joined
Nov 25, 2015
Messages
22
Location
Beyond...


It’s Friday night. You order a beer at a bar, use an app to tick it on your list, snap a pic, broadcast it on social media, and then refresh to see how many people liked it. Many of us (including us, on occasion) are guilty of this practice, which we call “the gamification of beer.”

The worst is seeing groups of people walk into a bar, immediately whip out their phones, and start ticking the night’s beers and liking each other’s brags. Really?!? What happened to just ordering a beer, enjoying it and your surroundings, and physically sharing the experience with the people around you?

Experiences like this are hollow, and ones that will never have any substance. Sure, you might get some digital reward from it, but come on, it’s just a stream of brags that doesn’t really matter. No one really cares, either. And despite its name, social media is morbidly anti-social. Its victims are living heads down and missing the world around them as they attempt to garner digital acceptance from people they’ve probably never met and never will. Meanwhile, their followers (also victims) suffer from FOMO (fear of missing out). Ironically, everyone misses out.

We, as a society, have essentially replaced the human touch with touch screens, turning the enjoyment of our (beer) lives into a game where there are no winners. So try this: the next time you visit a bar or brewery, talk to somebody about what they’re drinking. In person.

Respect Beer.
 
Joined
Dec 3, 2015
Messages
2,448
Location
NYC


It’s Friday night. You order a beer at a bar, use an app to tick it on your list, snap a pic, broadcast it on social media, and then refresh to see how many people liked it. Many of us (including us, on occasion) are guilty of this practice, which we call “the gamification of beer.”

The worst is seeing groups of people walk into a bar, immediately whip out their phones, and start ticking the night’s beers and liking each other’s brags. Really?!? What happened to just ordering a beer, enjoying it and your surroundings, and physically sharing the experience with the people around you?

Experiences like this are hollow, and ones that will never have any substance. Sure, you might get some digital reward from it, but come on, it’s just a stream of brags that doesn’t really matter. No one really cares, either. And despite its name, social media is morbidly anti-social. Its victims are living heads down and missing the world around them as they attempt to garner digital acceptance from people they’ve probably never met and never will. Meanwhile, their followers (also victims) suffer from FOMO (fear of missing out). Ironically, everyone misses out.

We, as a society, have essentially replaced the human touch with touch screens, turning the enjoyment of our (beer) lives into a game where there are no winners. So try this: the next time you visit a bar or brewery, talk to somebody about what they’re drinking. In person.

Respect Beer.
Right in the feels.
 

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