Business Idea: buying lots of old beer and making whiskey with it

Help Support Talkbeer:

Joined
Nov 20, 2016
Messages
158
Location
Wash DC
So I have heard of (though not tasted) Charbay Hop Whiskey, which is basically a distilled version of Racer 5. They have some other whiskies they have made using beers they have contracted to be made for these projects.

I had this idea a couple years ago looking at a mountain of Pumpkin beers that were not looking too likely to sold with any expediency: what if someone went around and bought back the (increasing) amount of beers which are sitting until out of code/ past their prime, and started distilling them?

Pumpkin beer alone - I could see someone doing cleanup duty at grocery stores who foolishly bought, and "continuously dumping beer bottles and cans" into a continuous still and making a pumpkin beer based spirit- which of course would need to rest in (new charred) american oak for 5yrs+, my question is how could this be profitable? You'd probably need the brewery to trade back new beer for the old stuff (at the retail level) then pickup truckloads of expired beer at nickels on the dollar, and take to distillery.

My main reason for making this post now, is I feel like as more and more beer gets made, whilst the same or less gets drank (thanks wine and spirits!) we are going to have more and more unsellable beer, not to mention the capacity that these breweries have financed that they do not, actually need.
 
Joined
Sep 30, 2013
Messages
15,996
Location
Stars Hollow, TX
I thought this was a reasonable idea. Guess not.
Not sure about laws in other states but you can't simply buy beer off the shelf and distill it here for commercial sale... you're crossing the 3-tier system at that point bringing the retail alcohol tier into the production tier.



That said you can do whatever you want for home use (er, well, technically that's illegal too. But you're not selling it). I know homebrewers that will save anything that they don't like (but still fermented) and distill it down when they have enough time. I've got a buddy that distilled a large amount of beer that had gotten infected and now has it aging on wood for instance.
 
Joined
Nov 20, 2016
Messages
158
Location
Wash DC
Not sure about laws in other states but you can't simply buy beer off the shelf and distill it here for commercial sale... you're crossing the 3-tier system at that point bringing the retail alcohol tier into the production tier.

That said you can do whatever you want for home use (er, well, technically that's illegal too. But you're not selling it). I know homebrewers that will save anything that they don't like (but still fermented) and distill it down when they have enough time. I've got a buddy that distilled a large amount of beer that had gotten infected and now has it aging on wood for instance.
Yeah, I mean it would not be efficient or reasonable to go store by store and like offer them ten cents on the dollar for beer that can't sell, I was thinking more of like a program with let's say for arguments sake Stone, who will have their wholesaler tradeout out of code Enjoy By at the retail level, and then instead of destroying it at their warehosue (or whatever they usually do), someone makes a swing by the wholesaler and picks up a couple hundred cases of beer. In this scenario you're probably just going to be dumping all the beer into one still, not doing a seperate distillation per beer.

Rough calculations you're yielding 2.25 gal per case- 7% abv beer, which you'd distill to 70%... you'd need like 250 cases of beer to fill a 53gal barrel with 70% spirit...

I'm not sure this gon work
 
Joined
Aug 14, 2014
Messages
1,480
Location
Paw Paw, MI
Yeah, I mean it would not be efficient or reasonable to go store by store and like offer them ten cents on the dollar for beer that can't sell, I was thinking more of like a program with let's say for arguments sake Stone, who will have their wholesaler tradeout out of code Enjoy By at the retail level, and then instead of destroying it at their warehosue (or whatever they usually do), someone makes a swing by the wholesaler and picks up a couple hundred cases of beer. In this scenario you're probably just going to be dumping all the beer into one still, not doing a seperate distillation per beer.

Rough calculations you're yielding 2.25 gal per case- 7% abv beer, which you'd distill to 70%... you'd need like 250 cases of beer to fill a 53gal barrel with 70% spirit...

I'm not sure this gon work
Maybe you should have done these calculations before wasting our time.
 
Top