Cellaring FAQ

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Just wanted to clarify that all corks are porous. Even champagne corks have shown loss of dissolved CO2 due to diffusion across the membrane. Oxygen will enter bottles of beer, regardless of the pressure of the CO2 in the bottle (Dalton's Law).

Source here and here

So if your beer is corked and dependent on environmental conditions, chances are oxygen is entering and CO2 is leaving the bottle.

As far as I know it's just sunlight that has really detrimental effects. Light can speed up some chemical reactions, but I don't think it's clear a priori whether that would be good or bad.

Regardless, I've never seen any information on this from any source that I would trust. I'll ask the one contact I have who might know.
Visible light skunks beer, so I'd assume it has effects on other compounds within the beer too.
 
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Finally got my beer fridge this week. Prior, I was storing my beer in an ambient temperature cooler.

During the occasional heatwaves of the first two months I've lived in my house, I had the desperate idea to put a bag of ice into the cooler to keep it from getting too much above 70. All seemed well, but when I went to transition the bottles from the cooler to the fridge, I realized that one of the bags had broken at some point and there was water on the bottom of the cooler. Some of the bottles developed mold on the side. Is my shit ruined? I know storing in humid conditions is a no no, but is it more of a long term no no or does any short term exposure compromise my stash?
 
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Some of the bottles developed mold on the side. Is my shit ruined? I know storing in humid conditions is a no no, but is it more of a long term no no or does any short term exposure compromise my stash?
Normal crown caps (metal bottle caps) are not permable to mold. Corks can be, depending on how long and how moldy they got.

If it's just on the side of the bottle, you are probably fine. Clean the bottles and enjoy your fridge!
 
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Normal crown caps (metal bottle caps) are not permable to mold. Corks can be, depending on how long and how moldy they got.

If it's just on the side of the bottle, you are probably fine. Clean the bottles and enjoy your fridge!
Phew, I suspected it probably wasn't a huge issue. Vast majority of the mold was on the sides of bottles (weirdly mostly the Russian River bottles).
 
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Phew, I suspected it probably wasn't a huge issue. Vast majority of the mold was on the sides of bottles (weirdly mostly the Russian River bottles).
That has happened to me before as well (when had 3 mini fridges as my "cellar"). The only explanation I can think of is that the mold is either in the labels or the bottles/labels themselves are a better substrate for mold growth.
 
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GREAT POST!! Only thing I don't agree on is how to store your bottles. Corked and caged bottles should be stored laying down so the liquid can contact the cork to keep the cork from drying. Metal capped bottles should never be layed down for more than a few days(shipping). The liquid in contact with metal is NOT a good thing and will give metallic notes and can promote rusting issues. Also a good tip but kinda a pain in the ass to do, is to store your growlers upside down (if it has a good seal of course)to keep carb from escaping.

CHEERS and once again GREAT POST!!!
 
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GREAT POST!! Only thing I don't agree on is how to store your bottles. Corked and caged bottles should be stored laying down so the liquid can contact the cork to keep the cork from drying. Metal capped bottles should never be layed down for more than a few days(shipping). The liquid in contact with metal is NOT a good thing and will give metallic notes and can promote rusting issues. Also a good tip but kinda a pain in the ass to do, is to store your growlers upside down (if it has a good seal of course)to keep carb from escaping.

CHEERS and once again GREAT POST!!!
I've laid bottles with metal caps on their side for years and never had metallic flavors or rust issues.

Isn't that lining on the inside of caps there for a reason?
 
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I've laid bottles with metal caps on their side for years and never had metallic flavors or rust issues.

Isn't that lining on the inside of caps there for a reason?

Laying em down like that is a huge gamble. Your placing a relatively acidic liquid on a metal cap. Yes there are linings on SOME caps but not all. Also bottles have a much greater chance of breaking laying on there side. Overall it's your beer and age as you please. Just a lil info on aging your beers with the best possible outcome. They're are many arguments in how to "properly" age brews but all in all it comes down to the bottle holders choice and palate.

CHEERS.
 
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Laying em down like that is a huge gamble. Your placing a relatively acidic liquid on a metal cap. Yes there are linings on SOME caps but not all. Also bottles have a much greater chance of breaking laying on there side. Overall it's your beer and age as you please. Just a lil info on aging your beers with the best possible outcome. They're are many arguments in how to "properly" age brews but all in all it comes down to the bottle holders choice and palate.

CHEERS.
Unless your beers are already old, they have a lining on the cap. Even the absolute cheapest, worst caps you see nowadays (looking at you Cantillon) have a lining on them. I just do not think this is an issue at all.
 
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I've never seen an actually unlined cap -- caps have to be lined with something, since something compressible needs to be between the glass and the metal or it cannot form a seal.

You can see the cork disk used in the original patent illustration:

 
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I've never seen an actually unlined cap -- caps have to be lined with something, since something compressible needs to be between the glass and the metal or it cannot form a seal.

You can see the cork disk used in the original patent illustration:

I think on some of the old ones the lining was just bad, so it would corrode with time. Modern ones are some kind of polymer so I don't think they'll be too chemically active.
 
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Corked and caged bottles should be stored laying down so the liquid can contact the cork to keep the cork from drying. Metal capped bottles should never be layed down for more than a few days(shipping). The liquid in contact with metal is NOT a good thing and will give metallic notes and can promote rusting issues. Also a good tip but kinda a pain in the ass to do, is to store your growlers upside down (if it has a good seal of course)to keep carb from escaping.
1. The 100% humidity inside a bottle will keep a cork moist in perpetuity. This is not a reason to keep liquid in contact with the cork. There may be others, but moisture is not one.

2. All metal caps sold in the last 30 years have a lining that will keep liquid from ever touching the cap. There may be other reasons to store them upright but your reasoning is not one of them.

3. Growlers upside down to keep the carb in? WTH. Is CO2 can escape the cap, CO2 will escape is the cap is wet or dry. This isn't how science works.
 
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1. The 100% humidity inside a bottle will keep a cork moist in perpetuity. This is not a reason to keep liquid in contact with the cork. There may be others, but moisture is not one.

2. All metal caps sold in the last 30 years have a lining that will keep liquid from ever touching the cap. There may be other reasons to store them upright but your reasoning is not one of them.

3. Growlers upside down to keep the carb in? WTH. Is CO2 can escape the cap, CO2 will escape is the cap is wet or dry. This isn't how science works.
It's already been pointed out that most caps have a lining. And corked bottles should be laid down. co2 will escape no matter what but it wants to travel upwards. If the cap is under 30+ oz of liquid it's much harder to escape!!!! I never said anything about growler caps being wet or dry!
So I guess my question is what's the point of the 1.2.3??? You just want to say I'm wrong on something we both agree on.

 
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It's already been pointed out that most caps have a lining. And corked bottles should be laid down. co2 will escape no matter what but it wants to travel upwards. If the cap is under 30+ oz of liquid it's much harder to escape!!!! I never said anything about growler caps being wet or dry!
So I guess my question is what's the point of the 1.2.3??? You just want to say I'm wrong on something we both agree on.

I don't think he agrees with a single thing you wrote. You said to lay corked beer on the side to keep the cork from drying out. He says that's false. You say to not lay capped bottles on the side because beer will contact the metal and not all caps have lining. He says that every cap in the last 30 years has a lining and there is no reason to worry about contact between beer and metal. You say to put growlers upside down to prevent CO2 from escaping. He says that makes no sense and tries to think of some reason you would even make that claim. Being under 30 oz. of liquid has nothing to do with how the gas will move inside a sealed container. So...yeah, I don't see any agreement, nor do I see a basis for any of the claims you made about storing beer.
 
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I don't think he agrees with a single thing you wrote. You said to lay corked beer on the side to keep the cork from drying out. He says that's false. You say to not lay capped bottles on the side because beer will contact the metal and not all caps have lining. He says that every cap in the last 30 years has a lining and there is no reason to worry about contact between beer and metal. You say to put growlers upside down to prevent CO2 from escaping. He says that makes no sense and tries to think of some reason you would even make that claim. Being under 30 oz. of liquid has nothing to do with how the gas will move inside a sealed container. So...yeah, I don't see any agreement, nor do I see a basis for any of the claims you made about storing beer.

Man you guys got a flame under your ass for this one!!!! Look man in one of my post I said its your beer and do as you please. Hell if you want do as stated above and lay your metal cap bottles side ways and stand up your corked bottles up.go right ahead. It's YOUR brew. But anyone with a lil common sense can see that if you want best possible results for brews you plan on aging for a significant amount of time you wouldn't wanna gamble with a acidic liquid on metal cap with a thin plastic liner or dried out corks. Especially with the price of brews these days. Even if you only got 20 bottles cellaring were still talking near 600$ with some quality lambics.
CHEERS!!!!!!!
 

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