Common misconceptions about Vacu-vin (Don't use one for beer!)

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I continue to wonder if a CO2-additive cap will ever be created for beer. I can hope...
I don't think this would be very hard to do, it's pretty easy to drill a hole in something and shove a Schrader valve in. Finding the appropriate thing would be the biggest challenge, by far. But once you have it, adding a valve should be fairly simple.
 
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I've used Vacu Vin on beers for short periods of time with minimal pumping with good results. The way I figured, I was trading carbonation for oxidation - which I was ok with. Maybe that was a bad assumption.

What if you were to plug the holes at the top of the Vacu-Vin after creating the vacuum? Would that fix the issue?
 
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Now in Portland!
The second someone accidentally overpressurizes a glass bottle and it blows up in their face, that company will be out of business and the owner swinging from the rafters.
It shouldn't be too hard to build in a number of simple safety features to prevent that.

First, you'll have some sort of pressure valve between the CO2 storage and the bottle, which can be set to a maximum value a little below what most beer bottles are rated at.
Second, have whatever method you have for keeping the cap on the bottle break its own seal with the bottle's mouth when that same pressure is reached, preventing overpressure in the event of a valve failure.
Last, you can add in a separate relief valve with a blowoff disk to the cap rated just a little higher pressure than the design pressure of the main valve and the cap. That way even if the main valve fails, and the cap has been wedged in weird, or taped on or whatever, the blowoff valve will still break open before the bottle does.
I've also never seen a bottle failure be catastrophic. I know it can happen, but all the failures I've seen appear pretty anticlimactic. I suspect that, combined with a few safety features, could make such a device pretty safe in practice.
 
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While I've enjoyed the threadcromancing and post-mortem likes, I must say that this is still an issue that a lot of laymans still don't get.

I'm glad that this has been a valuable resource to many of you, cuz science and stuff.

quinnsi I'll get back to your question in the morning. I'm kinda drunk off mead and autocorrect is getting the best of me right now.
 
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I've used Vacu Vin on beers for short periods of time with minimal pumping with good results. The way I figured, I was trading carbonation for oxidation - which I was ok with. Maybe that was a bad assumption.

What if you were to plug the holes at the top of the Vacu-Vin after creating the vacuum? Would that fix the issue?
Short answer: yes.

Long answer: depends on what you use/how you plug the holes.

I would imagine that if you used some sort of rubber stopper inserted into the hole that it would work fairly decently. What are you thinking of using?
 
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Link please.
When I was a beginner brewer I thought it would be a good idea to save some wort from a brew in capped 22 oz bottles to use later as starter wort.

I didn't have the cognitive capacity to understand that it needed to be boiled first.

After about 3 days, the bacteria (lactobacillus) had fermented enough, and enough pressure was built up, that 2 of the 4 bottles exploded. They were sitting on a shelf in the hallway near the bathroom. When I got home from work I noticed that my house smelled like vomit and as I was looking around I noticed a 2" shard of glass sticking out of the drywall. And rotten beer everywhere. The walls, the carpet, and the ceiling.

There were tiny shards of glass all over the place, and several pieces of glass sticking out of the drywall. And this was right near the area that my dog slept during the day.

Thankfully nobody was hurt (including the dog), and I put on an apron, a jacket, safety glasses, and gloves to pick up the unexploded bottles. I put them into a plastic tub with a lid and took the entire thing out to the garbage.

It took a week for that area of my house to air-out and for the stink to go away.
 
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When I was a beginner brewer I thought it would be a good idea to save some wort from a brew in capped 22 oz bottles to use later as starter wort.

I didn't have the cognitive capacity to understand that it needed to be boiled first.

After about 3 days, the bacteria (lactobacillus) had fermented enough, and enough pressure was built up, that 2 of the 4 bottles exploded. They were sitting on a shelf in the hallway near the bathroom. When I got home from work I noticed that my house smelled like vomit and as I was looking around I noticed a 2" shard of glass sticking out of the drywall. And rotten beer everywhere. The walls, the carpet, and the ceiling.

There were tiny shards of glass all over the place, and several pieces of glass sticking out of the drywall. And this was right near the area that my dog slept during the day.

Thankfully nobody was hurt (including the dog), and I put on an apron, a jacket, safety glasses, and gloves to pick up the unexploded bottles. I put them into a plastic tub with a lid and took the entire thing out to the garbage.

It took a week for that area of my house to air-out and for the stink to go away.
Can you put that in a handy link for me please?
 
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Jun 21, 2014
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Short answer: yes.

Long answer: depends on what you use/how you plug the holes.

I would imagine that if you used some sort of rubber stopper inserted into the hole that it would work fairly decently. What are you thinking of using?
I used tooth picks and it seemed to work OK.
 
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