Common misconceptions about Vacu-vin (Don't use one for beer!)

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Well, I know this was a reincarnated thread, but I really appreciated the technical approach you took domtronzero. However, the engineer in me wasn't satisfied without empirical evidence, so I created an experiment to test your theory that the CO2 will build up in the bottle to the point that it will open (and keep opening) the check valve. I chose Anna for the experiment because she tends to have a lot of carbonation and she is delicious.

Step 1: Open large bottle of beer and pour out ~8 oz into your favorite glass.


Step 2: Immediately pump out the bottle with a vacu-vin wine stopper.


Step 3: Cover wine stopper and all bottle lips with a balloon, making sure to push out any air from the balloon out the side as you seal it. Put bottle back into the fridge.


Step 4: Wait 21 hours (10 PM yesterday to 7 PM today) and remove bottle from fridge. Check balloon to see if any air has escaped past the vacu-vin's check valve and into the balloon.


Step 5: Pour 8 more oz of beer into the same glass, test for loss of carbonation or oxidation.


I noticed no volume increase in the balloon between steps 3 and 4, so in my one simple experiment, I feel like your theory about the CO2 buildup and the check valve did not hold. Did you run any physical tests domtronzero? My approach is definitely very basic, and the best experiment would measure carbonation levels over time across different beer styles and head space levels between both the vacu-vin method and the simple stopper method.

TL;DR I am going to keep using vacu-vin wine stoppers. The GIF below was one of the GIS results for "wine stoppers"

 
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Well, I know this was a reincarnated thread, but I really appreciated the technical approach you took domtronzero. However, the engineer in me wasn't satisfied without empirical evidence, so I created an experiment to test your theory that the CO2 will build up in the bottle to the point that it will open (and keep opening) the check valve. I chose Anna for the experiment because she tends to have a lot of carbonation and she is delicious.

Step 1: Open large bottle of beer and pour out ~8 oz into your favorite glass.


Step 2: Immediately pump out the bottle with a vacu-vin wine stopper.


Step 3: Cover wine stopper and all bottle lips with a balloon, making sure to push out any air from the balloon out the side as you seal it. Put bottle back into the fridge.


Step 4: Wait 21 hours (10 PM yesterday to 7 PM today) and remove bottle from fridge. Check balloon to see if any air has escaped past the vacu-vin's check valve and into the balloon.


Step 5: Pour 8 more oz of beer into the same glass, test for loss of carbonation or oxidation.


I noticed no volume increase in the balloon between steps 3 and 4, so in my one simple experiment, I feel like your theory about the CO2 buildup and the check valve did not hold. Did you run any physical tests domtronzero? My approach is definitely very basic, and the best experiment would measure carbonation levels over time across different beer styles and head space levels between both the vacu-vin method and the simple stopper method.

TL;DR I am going to keep using vacu-vin wine stoppers. The GIF below was one of the GIS results for "wine stoppers"

That's really cool!

I never used one personally, like I said I messed around with a stopper once and was able to get the valve to open with my lungs. Maybe it was a knockoff version? I can't remember.

Thanks for actually putting it to the test!

I think that your test shows that the pressure build up does not override the check-valve functionality, and I am confident about the Henry's law aspect. Partial pressure and dissolved gases are real-deal chemistry (although I'd still be interested in seeing an actual test of this to confirm still).

Cheers!

 

tosh

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Not quite - tried this for the first time last night with 1/3 bottle of Upright Anniversary. Kept at 55F overnight. Poured the remainder today and it's almost completely flat, and clearly tasting off.


I strongly advise people to not be a pussy and just finish the damn beer.
Fuck yeah
 
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Potential source of error: balloons are porous and the small pressure change could likely just not be strong enough to be visible. Repeat with Parafilm?

This is important science for the French press thread.
 
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